Houston Beyond Convention: The Photography of Ben DeSoto, 1980-Present

Houston Beyond Convention: The Photography of Ben Desoto, 1980-present reflects on three decades of work, past and present, produced by Houstonian Ben Tecumseh DeSoto. DeSoto’s career spans genres of photography and a diversity of human experiences. After discovering his love for what he has called the “scientific magic” of the photographic process, DeSoto followed his passion for photography to a career of chronicling his city. DeSoto has consistently challenged the viewer to see beyond static images of Houston, to look more deeply instead at the individual or community narrative behind the photograph.

Presented thematically, the exhibit showcases DeSoto’s documentation of Houston: portraits of local visual artists and musicians from fringe music and arts scenes, fine art photography, journalism, as well as his life’s work, the Understanding Poverty Project. Through photographs, news clippings, and audiovisual materials dating predominantly from 1980 through 2016, Houston Beyond Convention: The Photography of Ben Desoto, 1980-present, tells the story of Houston and delves deeper into the varying ethos—across class and race–and forces the viewer to move beyond conventional thinking.

Conversing Through Poetry

We meet to read poetry, short stories and more. We present a writer and his/her book, monthly, briefly talk about a particular form of poetry and read about a writers work; e.g.

Close to Home: Latinx Art and Identity

Latin Art from the Romo Collection”,”The exhibit is a cross-section of Latino/Chicano artists from the collection Harriet and Ricardo Romo. The exhibition includes prints and paintings with works dating from the 1980’s to the present. With an underpinning of themes related to the support of Latino/Chicano issues of identity, equality, and social justice, the arts presents an overview of four decades of various artists making their voices heard.

Collective Presence

Collective Presence is a four-part exhibition and curatorial project organized by DiverseWorks, in partnership with a cohort of Houston-based creatives, that features a series of micro-residencies, workshops, and community discussions that address current social and political issues impacting the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean.

Invited artists will join DiverseWorks from Feb 1 – April 14, 2019, to create new work on site and in conversation with each other to address the current politics of land, climate crisis, and environmental erasure. In addition to Collective Presence programs presented in conjunction with Latino Art Now!, DiverseWorks and Cynthia Woods Mitchell Center for the Arts, Kathrine G. McGovern College of the Arts will co-present a performance as part of the CounterCurrent19 (April 9-14, 2019).

Radical Memory: Works from the Gilberto Cardenas Collection

The works from this part of his collection will show diversity in artistic forms and styles in addition to their impact on the art world. These artists have made a lasting impact on the development of Latino art and related areas in their roles as artists, curators, leadership in developing and nurturing art spaces and community development.

Radical Memory: Works from the Gilberto Cardenas Collection

The works from this part of his collection will show diversity in artistic forms and styles in addition to their impact on the art world. These artists have made a lasting impact on the development of Latino art and related areas in their roles as artists, curators, leadership in developing and nurturing art spaces and community development.

The Art of Children’s Book Illustration: 25 Years of Piñata Books

For 25 years, Piñata Books has changed the children’s book publishing industry by providing readers with bilingual stories and colorful images that feature diverse characters and reflect the US Hispanic experience. Piñata Books is an imprint of Arte Público Press, the oldest and largest publisher of US Hispanic literature in the United States.

The Art of Children’s Book Illustration: 25 Years of Piñata Books invites the public to view original illustrations from the Arte Público Press collection. The exhibit will give readers a visual entryway into many of the stories that continue to educate and delight readers of all backgrounds.

South American Focus I

South American Focus I

ART BOX Gallery creates an exhibition called South American Focus for LAN. The gallery will include three local artists with different techniques, media and unique forms of expression between them.They are local artists from Venezuela, therefore we decided to focus in South America. We will have two exhibitions during the period of LAN, with the same artists but including different art works. One art show between February and March and the following one during April and May. Our artists Rosibel Ramirez, Lorena Morales and Carolina Otero will combine their work under the curatoratorial work of Maria Chevez. South American Focus will not only show our heritage as Latino, but as well as our commitment to living in the United States of America.

ART BOX Gallery
Micheline Newall & Maria Chevez

Carlos Cruz-Diez at the Cistern: Spatial Chromointerference

Wallflowers / Jasmine Zelaya

Outer Terrains

BOX 13 ArtSpace is pleased to present Outer Terrains – an exhibition curated by Tere Garcia and Victoria Paige Gonzalez, concurrent with the 2019 Latino Art Now! Conference. The exhibition opens with a curator led tour at 6PM followed by an opening reception on Saturday, February 23, from 7 – 9PM.

Outer Terrains presents a sensory experience of the sights and sounds of the U.S./Mexico borderscape. The exhibiting artists, engaging their relationship with the Texas border landscape, reveal what’s beyond the mirage from Texas’ blistering sun by shining light on the complex issues of where they call home. Nabil Gonzalez uses historical printmaking processes as she negotiates the past/present with unsolved, disturbing murders and disappearance of women surrounding El Paso, TX and Juarez, Mexico for the last 13 years. Jenelle Esparza elaborates on her work that explores the interconnected histories of South Texas cotton fields. Celeste de la Luna’s work is a tool to understand and deconstruct oppressive paradigms within the physical, spiritual, and psychic environment. Veronica Anne Salinas uses tape loops to investigate sound frequencies at the border.

The exhibitions continue through April 13, 2019. An Opening Reception will be held on Saturday, February 23, 2019, from 7 – 9PM at BOX 13 ArtSpace, 6700 Harrisburg, Houston, TX 77011.

The De la Torre Brothers Presented by Einar and Jamex de la Torre

Nicole Longnecker Gallery announces an exhibit for Latin Art Now!, San Diego-based glass artists Einar and Jamex de la Torre. Exploring cultural iconography, Einar and Jamex de la Torre blend traditional Mexican Folk Art imagery with tongue-in-cheek cultural commentary. Using unconventional glass working techniques, the brothers force a reassessment of a material often considered purely decorative. High and low culture, the sacred and the profane, the esoteric and the pop collide in their works.
“I’m delighted to present Einar and Jamex de la Torre to Houston during Latin Art Now!,” said gallery owner Nicole Longnecker. “They have spent a lifetime collaborating on award winning art. Their provocative flair and unique construction techniques push the boundaries of contemporary art.”

Fernando Casas

Through his work, Fernando Casas explores philosophical themes such as time, self and co-constitution.

Made in Tejas: Artworks from the Gilberto and Dolores Cardenas Collection

The exhibition Made in Texas features women artists whose careers and artistic production have been associated with Texas. The artworks featured in the show are drawn from the Gilberto and Dolores Cardenas art collection in Austin, Texas. A significant collector of modern and contemporary Hispanic and Latino art, Cardenas has been a driving force in the promotion and visibility of Latino Art in the United States. The exhibition provides a larger sample of established and emergent artists approaching themes of identity, labor, migration, and globalization.

Made in Tejas: Artworks from the Gilberto and Dolores Cardenas Collection

The exhibition Made in Texas features women artists whose careers and artistic production have been associated with Texas. The artworks featured in the show are drawn from the Gilberto and Dolores Cardenas art collection in Austin, Texas. A significant collector of modern and contemporary Hispanic and Latino art, Cardenas has been a driving force in the promotion and visibility of Latino Art in the United States. The exhibition provides a larger sample of established and emergent artists approaching themes of identity, labor, migration, and globalization.

Female Power: Vibrant Energy

This is a juried group exhibition of professional Latina artists based in the greater Houston area. The juror is Lorena Morales. The exhibition venue is at the Fort Bend County seat, the City of Richmond’s George Memorial Library in their exhibition gallery. This is a collaboration with the art museum CAM Fort Bend.

Nuestro Hogar / Our Home

An exhibit investigating the reclamation of home space through creation of a familiar space once lost or one that never existed outside of the artist’s ideation. The exhibit takes place in a 1914 historic home that is in itself a reclamation of home that is at once crystallized in the present and lost to the past.

Photography at its Limits: Marcos Lopez, Joiri Minaya, Oscar Munoz

Latin American and Latino artists have used photography to engage with modern media landscapes and critique globalized economies since the 1960s. But rarely are these artists considered leaders in discussions about the theory and scholarship of photography or included in conversations about the radical transformations of photography in the digital era. Curated by Natalia Brizuela, Associate Professor of Modern and Contemporary Latin American Literature & Culture at the University of California, Berkeley, and Jodi Roberts, the Robert M. and Ruth L. Halperin Curator of Modern & Contemporary Art at the Cantor Arts Center, this exhibition is an outgrowth of the recently-published landmark exhibition and accompanying text, The Matter of Photography in the Americas. The work selected for Houston Center for Photography’s galleries will focus on three artists: Marcos Lopez (Argentina), Joiri Minaya (Dominican Republic and USA), and Óscar Muñoz (Colombia), all who use photography as a foundation from which to question our relationships to Latin America as a region, its interconnectedness with the greater world, and the role the region has played in advancing photography’s technological evolution.

HUB HTX

MANTECAHTX co-founder Theresa Escobedo said, “As the curator of Union and Main Street Projects my vision is to survey and showcase a concise selection of artworks from emerging Latinx artists in order to demonstrate the diversity of heritage and cultural influence inherent in the thriving creative community active in Houston.”

Round 49: Penumbras: Sacred Geometries

Round 49: penumbras: sacred geometries is focused on artists whose practice incorporates the ideology of sacred geometries to form structures, landscape and allude to the body, intent and consciousness. In 1995, artist Bob Powell participated in Round 3, with the intention on deepening the sacred geometry theories while informally showing the ways that the paintings of artist Dr. John Biggers had mathematical concepts embedded in the work. Through this foundation that has been laid, artists in Round 49 will create site-specific installations six shot-gun-style houses on Holman Street.

HUB HTX

MANTECAHTX co-founder Theresa Escobedo said, “As the curator of Union and Main Street Projects my vision is to survey and showcase a concise selection of artworks from emerging Latinx artists in order to demonstrate the diversity of heritage and cultural influence inherent in the thriving creative community active in Houston.

Equilibrium / Equilibrio

We are planning an opening to the general public 6:00pm – 8:00pm Friday, March 22nd with an Artist Talk during the evening, a panel discussion bridging the cultural understanding regarding Afro-Cuban and other Afrikan Diasporic influences (April 5, 6:00pm & 6, 2:00pm – 4:00pm)

Here, Ahora: Houston, Latinx, Queer Artists Under 30

Here, Ahora: Houston, Latinx, Queer Artists Under 30″,”This exhibition seeks to highlight the complexity and inclusiveness of Latinx identity with young, LGBTQ artists of color based in Houston, working in various mediums and practices, who show amazing potential to shape and innovate Latinx art and discourse in the years to come. Overall, Here, Ahora will highlight artists who work in photography, multimedia, sculpture, performance, fashion, etc. who identify as LGBTQ, Latinx, Black, Mexican, Salvadoran, Honduran, Afro Latinx and much more. This exhibition aims to innovate discourse regarding practices and aesthetics in a Latinx context by also featuring writing by LGBTQ authors/poets that respond to each artist that will be available to the public either online or print or through panel discussions among the writers and artists, performances and/or readings.

The V Element

Four of the five artists participating in the V Element group show are well-known members of one of the most vibrant and rich artistic legacies in Mexico. Rolando Rojas, Saúl Castro, Didier Mayés and Ixrael Montes are artists and printmakers who live and work in Oaxaca. Each has his own distinct style; however, all are associated with, and inspired by a long visual arts tradition that includes such illustrious Masters as Rufino Tamayo, Francisco Toledo, Guillermo Cabrera, Rodolfo Morales and Rodolfo Nieto. The Southern region of Mexico, where Oaxaca is located, is routinely celebrated for its unique artistic and graphic arts output, its cultural institutions and a plethora of art and printmaking studios. The work of these artists, which has been exhibited around the world, exemplifies the exquisite quality and range of contemporary art and printmaking in Mexico.
The V Element group exhibit will include carefully selected paintings and prints (lithographs, engravings, serigraphs, linocuts and oleographs) and will also incorporate the work of a fifth artist, a local Houston artist, to be announced on the day of the opening reception — as a way of building upon the ongoing artistic dialogue between Oaxaca and Houston, cities that function as major cultural centers in Mexico and the U.S.

Houston Latino Film Festival

The Houston Latino Film Festival will be presented on March 28th – 31st,
2019 at Talento Bilingue de Houston and The MATCH. Join us for a weekend to celebrate and enjoy compelling films from the brightest and emerging filmmakers from the U.S., Latin America, Spain and Portugal.

ŌME Presented by Daniela Riojas and Zachary Fabri

In “ŌME,” artists Daniela Riojas and Zachary Fabri examine a dual Mestizaje and Afro-Latinx experience in a 5-part performance that expresses historical encounters between Indigenous and African peoples, focusing on pre-Colombian evidence of their connection through water travel and the subsequent brown/black impacts during Iberian colonialism. “”ŌME”” will utilize the unique acoustic design and take place in SITE Gallery Houston in April
2019 as a part of the Houston chapter of Latino Art Now!, a national conference designed to explore the rich-ness and depth of Latinx art.

BioArt Bayou-torium / ArteBio Bayou-torio

The Bio-Art Bayou-torium is a socially engaged science laboratory and art-making site situated on the banks of Buffalo Bayou across from Tony Marron Park in the Second Ward. It partners with the Buffalo Bayou Partnership to engage the general public in a new experience with this often hidden natural resource. The Bayou-torium’s art studio-laboratory houses microscopes, imaging equipment and studio space for making art based on the nature and history of Buffalo Bayou. Digital photography, microscopy, video and audio recording (as well as traditional watercolor, drawing) are among the variety of media that attendees can utilize. This interdisciplinary laboratory will stock plant and wild life specimens collected from the Bayou in aquariums and terrariums. By using scientific tools with ethical methodologies attendees are also encouraged to experiment with the bio-material as an art medium. Field excursions along the shorelines and pontoon boat tours will introduce and educate visitors about the complex ecosystem and history of Houston’s main waterway. Bi-lingual art assistants with expertise in wild life and the stories of the Bayou in the Second Ward will guide attendees to collect and record what they see and experience and bring them back to the laboratory to re-image, photograph, video and draw. The Bayou-torium is a novel combination of social engagement with the art-science experince to provide an inventive and surprising aesthetic experience with Buffalo Bayou. It is free and the public of all ages are invited.

Looking For A Hero

Gerardo Rosales’s art deals with issues of domestic labor, gender violence and class discrimination experienced by immigrants from Latin America like himself. In Rosales’s body of work, his native Venezuelan “naïve” folk art or the “a-political” expressions in modernist abstractions are purposedly appropriated and paradoxically transformed into powerful vehicles to denounce poignant social problems.

Living in Houston for the last 18 years, Rosales’s new exhibit “Looking for a Hero” addresses local and immigrant communities at large.
The exhibit spins a biting narrative around fantasies and realities surrounding domestic workers’s lives. Thus, on the one hand,, imagining workers were given leasure time, Rosales transforms their cleaning utensils, such as mops, into luxurious, satirical wigs evoking those worn in the court of Marie Antoinette during the French Revolution. On the other hand, Rosales presents a series of tableaux where domestic workers’s silhouettes are embedded within a backdrop of iconic geometric patterns replicating those designed by Italian architect Gio Ponti for homes of Latin American art patrons. The workers’s figures, like their lives, are subsumed within the abstract background. They are hardly discernible since their uniforms mimic the same pattern of the overall design.

Volver

Space HL is please to present our newest exhibition by artist Moe Penders in partnership with Latino Art Now and the City of Houston. Volver is a project featuring large scale photographs, and sculptures addressing the violent history of El Salvador and the mystery surrounding the death of the artist’s father in 1993. The interdisciplinary installation and exhibition focuses on historical moments of the period within political turmoil and personal tragedy. Pender works the mystery and dangers that still continue to plague the lives today of fellow Salvadorans who still face the dangers of oligarchy, war, inequality of wealth and corruption which follows.

The project will mainly focus on a personal story, which can be paired with events in Penders’s life and the history of El Salvador. Houston is a city filled with immigrants from Central America and many more countries around the world. This narrative is not exclusive to El Salvador. This is the experience the artist is familiar with, and it may speak to many people who are part of the Central American diaspora, but will not be limited to this group. As this project is an investigation based on the death of my father, it will touch on intersectionality. Making reference to historic events such as the civil war in El Salvador and involvement the US has had in many political issues there, and the manners in which this affects people today Volver brings together a more precise image of a scarred history we all share. Through installation, photography, and sculpture Penders uses cues from the past to build a more comprehensive investigation in injustice and torn equality. Volver becomes an ongoing essay into war, death, warp political intervention, and those seeking asylum. @spacehltx

Nueva Visión de Nuestra Cultura

For too long have our livelihoods and identities been in control of another. It is time LatinXs once again come together to redefine who we are. Rather than focusing on the negative aspects of our history and our lived experiences, we want to create a vision full of positivity in order to revitalize LatinXs to march onward into the future. Nuestro Futuro! Nuestra Cultura! Viva! Viva!

Visual Poetry

I intend to create 8 original pieces inspired by the hieroglyphs of ancient meso america. I will show my work at the Houston public library located on McKinney st. In downtown Houston. My work is an attempt at visual poetry meaning it comes from a study of language and is shaped and laid out with graphic and artistic application. I am a recipient of the Houston arts alliance
2019 grant for creative individuals. I would like to one the artist featured.

Chell Vassallo

Oil paintings and charcoal drawings representing mythological scenes combined with symbols of our present time.

Latinx Art:Transcending Borders

Ruiz-Healy Art, San Antonio & NYC partners with Octavia Art Gallery, Houston to present the work of Latinx artist from their gallery program. The selected artists deal with Borderland discourse and issues of belonging and migration.

Las Fronteras: Houston artists in Nature

L.O.C.C.A.: Law Office Center or Citizenship and Art hosts a program of two events, Wednesday April 3rd. 7pm – 9:30pm and Sunday April 7th, 7pm – 9:30pm. Exhibitions, video screenings and performances will be followed by artists talks and panel discussions about the intersection of art with science, nature and biology. Moderators from the sectors of science and art will dialog with the presenting artists to discuss their art practice working with the local ecosystem, biology, the influence, mediation and methodology of science and science tools, and its relation to Mexican-American, Hispanic and Latino/a/x culture, history and society. Attendees are invited to participate in a Q. & A. with the artists and moderators following the presentations.

21st Anniversary of Nuestra Palabra: Latino Writers Having Their Say- A Mixed Media Celebration

Librotraficantes, Macondo, and Cultural Capital: 21 Years of Nuestra Palabra

This mixed media celebration in honor of Nuestra Palabra: Latino Writers Having Their Say 21st anniversary is part of a movement to put Houston’s Latinx Community’s Cultural Capital on the map.

This evening of literary giants from around the country will feature music and Chicano and Latinx art from the holdings of the Museum of Fine Arts Houston. Each component has a connection to Houston and Nuestra Palabra in ways that have never been imagined. This multimedia show rings in a new era that will be quantify, cultivate, and accelerate Houston’s Latinx Cultural Capital.

This event will feature the art work of Chicano icon Luis Jimenez, the brilliant insights of Mari Carmen Ramirez-MFAH, the banned prose of award-winning writers Ana Castillo and Dagoberto Gilb, and the audacity of the Librotraficantes who, under the leadership of Tony Diaz, El Librotraficante, smuggled banned works across state lines. Houston’s cultural capital is a potent testament that only art can save us. The co-founder of Critical Race Theory, Dr. Richard Delgado has been invited to put into context Houston’s role in this new era of activism and art.

Expect additional International art and local music that will provide the sound track to an artistic revolution.

Axis Mundo: Queer Networks in Chicano L.A.; Place, Color y Sand

Lawndale is pleased to present two exhibitions in celebration of LAN!.

Axis Mundo: Queer Networks in Chicano L.A. is an exhibition of work by a collaborative network of over 50 L.A.-based queer Chicanx artists produced through the 1960s to 1990s, including sound pioneer and Houston native Pauline Oliveros. Axis Mundo is presented in collaboration with LAN! and the Inter University Program for Latino Research (IUPLR) based at the University of Houston.

Place, Color y Sand, features work by Carlos Rosales-Silva and Eric Santoscoy-Mckillip that traces and confronts their personal histories and identities within the Lantinx, Mexican-American and Chicanx Cultures.

Adar Conmigo – Alexander Arzú

The Andar Conmigo exhibition hosted in Alexander Arzú’s personal studio located inside of Art Square Studios (2315 Commerce, St 17) will run the duration of the Latino Art Now Conference from April 4th – 6th,
2019 from 4pm-8pm each day, with the artist and curator present. This will be an opportunity to explore the different facets of Garifuna history and identity through the art and lens of Arzú, a first-generation US born visual artist of Honduran Garifuna heritage. This will be a multimedium exhibition including sketches, paintings, photography, digital art, video and music. There will be various text installed that will give background on Garifuna history, language, culture and cosmovision. Some of the topics to be covered will be: socio-political history and composition, lifestyle practices, music and art. The exhibition will be bilingual.

Formally trained as an architect, graduating from the University of Houston in 2009, Arzú transitioned to being a full-time artist in 2013. His day job is as a tattoo artist, but Arzú has worked heavily in the public domain in recent years. His experience has varied from private commission to contracts created in partnership with the City of Houston to various mural festivals in Texas. By adapting his work to the intended audience he is relatable, allowing people from all walks of life to connect and draw different meanings of his craft, color and composition. You can view updates on this exhibition and more of Alex’s work by following him on Instagram @alexarzu or @zuartco. Nos vemos!

Latino Art Now! Conference

The 6th Latino Art Now! Conference, Sight Lines & Time Frames will take place at the University of Houston. LAN is a signature event of the Inter-University for Latino Research (IUPLR) consortium and hosted by the University of Houston Center for Mexican American Studies (UH-CMAS). LAN is a national forum for artists, art historians, art professionals, curators, collectors, educators, scholars, critics, art dealers, and the public.

Keynote Speaker: Mari Carmen Ramírez, Wortham Curator of Latin American Art at the MFAH

Cruz Ortiz

Cruz Ortiz, who lives and works in San Antonio, Texas, uses painting, print, sculpture, drawing, and public activation to address issues related to his experiences growing up in the bicultural landscape of South Texas.

Aliens, Immigrants, & Other Evil Doers

A sci-fi Latino noir solo show by MAP Fund award-winning performance artist José Torres-Tama that takes the Immigration issue head on, and challenges the anti-immigrant hysteria. He exposes the hypocrisies of a country that dehumanizes immigrants while readily exploting their labor. Inspired by interviews of immigrants who have crossed the border to escape economical despair and war, he shape-shifts into a variety of voices that humanize a people in search of a dream. ALIENS is profoundly moving, visually dynamic, and provocatively funny with the artist’s comic battle cry:
NO GUACAMOLE for Immigrant haters!

ALIENS was developed through a National Performance Network Creation Fund, and was co-commissioned by MECA in Houston, the Ashé Cultural Arts Center in New Orleans, and GALA Hispanic Theatre in DC.

Africa in the Americas: An Interactive Musical Experience

The event is a conversation presented by renowned Venezuelan musician and professor Leo Blanco, Berklee College of Music – Boston, exploring the history and influence of African rhythms in the diverse music of the Americas, including, but not limited to salsa, merengue, punta, and bachata.

Viva Frida! 14th Annual Frida Festival

The Frida Art Exhibition and Viva Frida! Festival is a free, family and pet friendly event featuring an art exhibition at Hardy & Nance Studios, including a Look-a-Like Contest on Friday, April 5th on the opening of the Exhibit; and, an outdoor Festival for all Frida lovers featuring an EESG Art and Consignment Booth, Sculpture Exhibit, A Mercado de Artesanos on Avenida de las Americas with art, vendor artisan crafters, designers and importer booths. The Festival also features a Frida-themed fashion show, live music, DJ, Mariachis, Folklorico performances, Aztec Dancer Performance, a special performance by Karina Nistal, Children’s Activity Center, Casa Azul Lounge, Food by Harris County General Store, Mi Patio, Churros by Planet Churro, Foodie Booths and so much more!

Einar and Jamex de la Torre Art Exhibit Opening Reception

Nicole Longnecker Gallery announces an exhibit for Latin Art Now!, San Diego-based glass artists Einar and Jamex de la Torre. The exhibit opens Saturday, April 6, 2019 with an artist’s reception from 5pm – 8pm and runs through May 11, 2019.

Nicole Longnecker Gallery announces an exhibit for Latin Art Now!, San Diego-based glass artists Einar and Jamex de la Torre. Exploring cultural iconography, Einar and Jamex de la Torre blend traditional Mexican Folk Art imagery with tongue-in-cheek cultural commentary. Using unconventional glass working techniques, the brothers force a reassessment of a material often considered purely decorative. High and low culture, the sacred and the profane, the esoteric and the pop collide in their works

Nuestra Realidad – Our Reality

“Nuestra Realidad – Our Reality” will feature work by our Latino gallery artists in various media. Founded in 1969, Hooks-Epstein Galleries, Inc., is one of Houston’s longest running art galleries. Representing established, mid-career and emerging artists, the gallery pioneered the museum area while remaining in the forefront as specialists in late 19th, 20th and 21st century representational American, European, and Latin works of art. Along with a particular emphasis on sculpture and works on paper, the gallery is also Houston’s premier resource for works in the secondary market. Many of Houston’s most prominent art collections include works acquired through Hooks-Epstein Galleries. Celebrating its 50th year of existence, the gallery has mounted many exhibitions which received national and international acclaim. The gallery has published catalogues which continue to be used as a source of information and has produced exhibitions which have traveled from the gallery to museums and other venues.

Tejas Got Soul: Early Chicano Sounds in Houston’s East End

Explore the Soul roots of Tejano music in Houston. Join us for a day-long event highlighting pioneering musicians from Houston’s East End and their contributions to an nationally-noted style of music – Tejano Soul. Enjoy live performances and dancing, share your own experiences at the storytelling tent, visit the digitization stations with your posters and photographs and hear local musicians and scholars discuss these important musical developments. For older enthusiasts, help us build an archive; and for younger music fans, come and learn more about the era and the music.

From the late 1950’s to the early 1970’s, Houston-based acts, such as the Crystals, The Stardusters, and Manuel Mendiola Y Los Exiles, and the Houston-based, historically significant lineup of Sunny the Sunliners were a culturally important part of the lives of many Houston Chicanos. Tejas Got Soul will bring together friends, fans, musicians, DJs, scholars, archivists and new admirers of the music to honor and celebrate this history and culture. These stories have been underrepresented and need to be explored and recorded by community members, made available to educate the public, and collected into an accessible public archive.

Morales Radio Hall, previously the home of KLVL, the first bilingual radio station in Houston, is the venue for Tejas Got Soul. The project is sponsored by the East End Foundation and funded in part by The Morales Foundation, the Houston Arts Alliance and the East Chamber of Commerce. Supporting partners are East End Management District, Houston Public Library, UH Libraries and The University of Houston Center for Mexican American Studies.

Horizonte Live ART + Music featuring Latina artist Geraldina Interiano Wise accompanied by the MUSIQA Quartet hosted at The Glade Arts Foundation

Latina Houston artist Geraldina Interiano Wise and Houston-based new music collective MUSIQA present a live painting and music performance of Annie Gosling’s The Blue Horse Walks on the Horizon at the Glade Arts Foundation in The Woodlands, TX. With The Woodlands’ thriving Latino community and The Glade Arts Foundation’s robust collection of Latin American art, Glade is an optimal venue for such a multi-disciplinary Latino-themed artistic experience.
Performance art and the harnessing of repeatable spontaneity were breakthroughs by artists such as Texan artist Robert Rauschenberg—whose Timed Paintings are a seminal source of inspiration for this project—and choreographer/dancer Trisha Brown who often collaborated with Rauschenberg. These art happenings were a part of a changing landscape of art in the 60’s, 70’s and early ’80’s.
This artistic collaboration came about from a shared value of decoding the arts, thus making them accessible to all. Annie Gosfield’s seventeen-minute piece for string quartet informs the gestural nature of Geraldina Wise’s abstract expressionism, which may look spontaneous, but has been choreographed through an immersion process that has yielded a unique artistic vocabulary—her visual code to the music.
After the presentation, a panel discussion will include MUSIQA Artistic Director, Dr. Anthony Brandt, artist Geraldina Interiano Wise, and Glade Curator Joseph Staley, to explore how creativity, cognition, and society co-evolves and co-exists. The discussion will be moderated by Rosemary Salum, editor of Literal Magazine, Houston.

International Book Fest/ Conversing Through Poetry/TBH

The public will have the opportunity to meet authors and buy book written in Spanish and English. Singers, ballet folclóricos, children entertainments, information how’re be published. Exposition of arts and craft. Food. Free to the public

El Zócalo – 72 Miles | 72 Stories

72 Miles | 72 Stories; a culminating event in 72 Hours, April 11 – 13 in the Alley’s Neuhaus Theatre. This will be a curated, city-wide story event where students, families, and organizations will present their stories along with selected artistic participants that will add their monologues, poems, dance and musical offerings on the themes explored by Hilary Bettis’ new play 72 Miles to Go.

About the Play:
72 miles. It’s the distance between Tucson, Arizona and Nogales, Mexico—and the distance between deported immigrant Anita and her American-born husband and children. 72 Miles to Go… follows one family over a decade as they come of age, fall in love, fight in wars, and fight for each other, against the backdrop of deportation, DACA, and changing immigration laws.

72 Miles to Go by Hilary Bettis will have workshop performances at the Alley All New Festival January 18 – 27,
2019. Free to the public.

ABOUT EL ZÓCALO
Inspired by the traditional meeting places found all over Latin America, Alley Theatre’s metaphoric “El Zócalo” is a place-making initiative to celebrate, grow, and interact with Houston’s diverse Latin culture and artistic community. Alley Theatre is proud to join together with well-established cultural and social organizations and Houston-area schools to foster community and reinforce Houston’s presence as a diverse arts center that serves every neighborhood in its community.